My friend is dead: My friend is not dead.

Today a friend of mine died. And I found out on Twitter.

Actually, that’s not correct. In fact, not at all.

Instead, a person of the same age range, name, and location died, and I found out on Twitter. I spied a tweet announcing the death of someone who appeared to be my friend, and had to deal with a rising panic while trying to sort the situation.

It took me a good five minutes to find out that the Ahmed Naguib I know, a student living in Cairo, and activist, was not the Ahmed Naguib, of the same age range and locale, that had been killed.

It started like this:

@Gsquare86: “Another dead clinically Ahmed Naguib, 18 years old #MorsiMubarak #acab from clashes Mohamed Mahmoud st”

I followed up:

“Can anyone confirm that @ahmednaguib is alright? I’m seeing that someone by his name is dead in Egypt.”

And:

“@Gsquare86 is that @ahmednaguib? Please respond.”

Happily, the Ahmed that I know was watching Twitter, and got back to me quickly:

@ahmednaguib: “@alex @gsquare86 no not me”

And:

“I’m not dead, ladies and gentlemen. Sadly, another person with the same name as mine is gone. May he RIP.”

Ahmed Naguib, the one that I know, is actually 21 it turns out.

I told this short story to my close friend and coworker Brad McCarty, who responded, “way too close for comfort.”

Yes.

Stay safe, everyone.

 
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